Chain and sprocket replacement

Mechanical questions, help, and tutorials.
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Sportbiker
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Chain and sprocket replacement

Postby Sportbiker » Mon Jun 24, 2013 9:47 pm

After a chat with Shagz at BF, I realized I'd better check mine. Sure enough, now that I've changed back to street tires I find one part of the chain much tighter than another such that both can't be in spec at the same time. The old trick of pulling the chain on the rear sprocket is hooey, from my vantage point. Passes muster for me. But the chain is clearly bound up somewhere.

I've looked into changing gearing and am going up two in the rear to help me deal with being in a strange shift point mid-turn when at Road America. The next point to ask about is if anyone has a rivet tool for the chain.

I'm planning to pick up some Supersprox because they retain the strength of steel on the rear while lightening the sprocket with aluminum in the center. Clever.

Any tips for this? Looks pretty straightforward but thought I'd see if anyone had some wisdom to share.
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Postby shagzomatic » Tue Jun 25, 2013 8:28 am

There are a bunch of youtube howto videos out there that show how it's done. It's really simple if you have the right tools. If you're planning on doing it yourself in the future, investing in a chain tool is worth it. Personally, I have the RK Excel breaker/press/rivet tool. If you don't want to invest at the moment...well, now you know someone who has one.

Tip-wise, I grind down the rivet head that I'm pushing out to break the chain before starting. Makes it easier on both you and your tool. Beyond that, be sure you get a rivet master link, not a clip. Others may disagree on this one, but personally I don't trust clips to stay on. :twocents:
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Re: Chain and sprocket replacement

Postby Sportbiker » Wed Jul 31, 2013 8:46 pm

Picked up a 520 conversion but have two rear wheels, one for street and one for track. Anybody have this kind of situation? I'm not sure what to do about the rear sprocket. Move it from wheel to wheel when I change them out? Buy a second sprocket (in Aluminum for street)? Use the old stock one on street which is in good shape? Obviously I'd rather not spend another $80.

Will probably want to borrow that tool please....
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Postby shagzomatic » Wed Jul 31, 2013 8:55 pm

Are both wheels OEM? If so, you could just move the sprocket carrier between wheels. Quick and easy.
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Re: Chain and sprocket replacement

Postby Caz » Fri Aug 02, 2013 5:28 pm

id just buy another sprocket with a dif tooth number prob oem that way your starting to have options for dif tracks. this sounds like the perfect excuse for another sprocket
"Carry the front wheel half a centimeter in the air all the way up the hill at 150mph put it down just over the rise, it's just a timing issue." Colin Edwards, "The Doctor, the tornado and the Kentucky Kid"

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Re: Chain and sprocket replacement

Postby Sportbiker » Fri Aug 02, 2013 9:01 pm

Caz wrote:id just buy another sprocket with a dif tooth number prob oem that way your starting to have options for dif tracks. this sounds like the perfect excuse for another sprocket

That sir is brilliant. And might I say, great minds think alike. I was considering a stock tooth for street to avoid being too high on revs.

shagz, having never done a rear sprocket change I didn't realize I could pull the coupling out until now, when I looked at my service manual. There are no actual instructions but I'll just get the new one on and pull, hoping for the best :) I'm sure some bearing grease is needed in there anyway and won't take but a second.....
Shitty planning on your part does not constitute an emergency on mine.

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Postby shagzomatic » Fri Aug 02, 2013 9:28 pm

Let me know whenever you're ready to do your chain. I could either swing by and give you a hand or figure out a time to get those tools to you.
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Re: Chain and sprocket replacement

Postby Sportbiker » Sun Aug 11, 2013 1:19 pm

Thanks for the help Saturday. The checkout ride went smoothly and she's all set to go. Definitely love the laser alignment tool.
Shitty planning on your part does not constitute an emergency on mine.

Sportbiker's tips on what not to do when you want to sell something:
    Post an artistic picture where your bike takes up 5% of the area.
    "Price firm but willing to negotiate."